Wild Dagga Tea & Wild Dagga Resin Psychoactive Effects

Perhaps the best explanation of Wild Dagga (Lion's Ear and Lion's Tail) we can offer are from an actual person who has experience with this amazing plant: 

 

"I was told that Wild Dagga Tea can be somewhat unpleasant, but there have been so many traditional medicinal uses for this plant, as well as so many within indigenous cultures in Africa for so long, that I couldn't help my curiosity.  Instead of trying to gulp down some tea made form Klip Dagga, also known as "Leonotis Nepetifolia" I decided to get some of the resins and a little bit of the tincture that is widely available on the web, though my favorite source is HERE

The resin had a pleasant violet scent to it, and I decided to dissolve 1/2 of the gram that I had into some hot water.  I added a bit of honey, just in case it was going to be bitter like I had read so many times.  To my surprise, the flavor was quite pleasant, almost flower-like, and after my difficult day at work, this was a welcome experience.

The Wild Dagga resin is made from Cured Wild Dagga leaf, which itself, is made from the stronger strain called "Klip Dagga" (anyone can correct me if I have it backwards).  It is both water and ethanol (alcohol!) soluble, so resins are usually made with a double extraction of water and ethanol.  One comforting thing about the Wild Dagga resins, is that harsh chemicals do not extract efficiently, so when you purchase the resins, you can be assured that they are not going to have any harsh chemicals in them and they most-likely are going to be all-natural.  If you want to make a resin yourself, you will need some sort of distiller such as a Coldfinger Extractor, but the resin is plentiful on the net, so it is really unnecessary to go through the trouble.

Anyway, I was pleasantly relaxed and could easily see why this is such a popular herb.  I definitely could have dissolved the entire 1 gram of the resin, but instead, I decided to use the other 1/2 gram of resin in combination with some of the dried leaf to make a tea.  This proved to be a nice combination.  I was relaxed, and the leaves actually made the tea more pleasant...

There doesn't seem to be much of a difference between the resin and the tinctures that are available.  It is my guess that the Wild Dagga tinctures and the Wild Dagga resins are the same exact product; one probably is dried to a resin, and the other is simply put into a bottle as a tincture.  If it were me, I would simply buy the resin and dissolve it into some Everclear to make my own tincture; it's probably less expensive anyway. 

But, whatever the details of each preparation are, I was pleasantly surprised with the effects of the Wild Dagga, especially since I wasn't expecting anything much."

If you want to find out more, here is some research on the difference between the different Wild Dagga strains in their Wild Dagga article that describes the plant with photos.  Yeah, they sell it, but I haven't found the same information anywhere else so far.

Further Articles for Wild Dagga

Dispelling Wild Dagga Species Confusion - An easy to read comparison.

The Diterpenoids of Leonurus leonotus - An interesting clinical study.

Dagga/Yopo Experience Report - A positive story by an unknown author.

Folk, Traditional, and Medical Uses for Wild Dagga - Explained in detail.

Growing Wild Dagga - Cultivating Leonotis leonurus plants.

Botany of Leonurus (Mint Family) - From the Herba database.

Hottentot Tribes and Wild Dagga - Brief history of who the Hottentot's were.

South Africa's Nature - One explorer's account.

Synthesis of Leonurine - A brief abstract.

Motherwort - The True Dagga Plant - Ancient plant with many uses.